Test Results

Obtaining Test Results

We ask you to telephone for test results (eg blood, urine, X-ray) after 10:30 each day.

To ensure confidentiality, we only release results to the patient, or to parents of minors (under 16 years) if appropriate, unless alternative arrangements have been agreed in writing.

What do my test results mean?

 

NORMAL results 

Results filed as NORMAL are just that! The values for blood tests or the report if it’s a swab, x-ray or scan fit within the expected ranges for normal healthy people. 

SATISFACTORY results

Results filed as SATISFACTORY may be very slightly above or below normal values for blood tests or in the case of scans and x-rays have very slight variations in how things should look. However in the context of the overall clinical picture they can be regarded as normal. They do not require further tests or discussion.

REPEAT test required 

Sometimes it is necessary to repeat a test, reasons for this include laboratory equipment failure, an unsuitable sample or suspicion that the test result is “spurious” this means that the result is so far out of kilter that it is likely to be wrong (it is well recognised that even the best laboratory equipment can produce random odd results).

Make a GP appointment

Your results are back and have been reviewed by one of our Clinicians (GP, ANP or Practice Nurse) who has decided that it is best for you to discuss the results. This does not necessarily mean that there is something to worry about; it may mean that the Clinician who requested your tests in the first place wants to see you, it may mean that there are further tests that could be useful or it may mean that the tests have found the cause of your problem. 

Make a Nurse appointment

Your results are back and have been reviewed by one of our Clinicians (GP or Practice Nurse) who has decided that it is best for you to discuss the results. This does not necessarily mean that there is something to worry about; it usually means that the results are related to a long-term condition that you may already have (such as diabetes or high blood pressure) and that we need to improve the control and treatment of that condition.

Blood Tests

A blood test is when a sample of blood is taken for testing in a laboratory. Blood tests have a wide range of uses and are one of the most common types of medical test. For example, a blood test can be used to:

  • assess your general state of health
  • confirm the presence of a bacterial or viral infection
  • see how well certain organs, such as the liver and kidneys, are functioning

A blood test usually involves the phlebotomist taking a blood sample from a blood vessel in your arm and the usual place for a sample is the inside of the elbow or wrist, where the veins are relatively close to the surface. Blood samples from children are most commonly taken from the back of the hand. The childs hand will be anaesthetised (numbed) with a special cream before the sample is taken.

You can find out more about blood tests, their purpose and the way they are performed on the NHS Choices website.

X-Rays

An X-ray is a widely used diagnostic test to examine the inside of the body. X-rays are a very effective way of detecting problems with bones, such as fractures. They can also often identify problems with soft tissue, such as pneumonia or breast cancer.

If you have an X-ray, you will be asked to lie on a table or stand against a surface so that the part of your body being X-rayed is between the X-ray tube and the photographic plate.

An X-ray is usually carried out by a radiographer, a healthcare professional who specialises in using imaging technology, such as X-rays and ultrasound scanners.

You can find out more about x-ray tests, how they are performed, their function and the risks by visiting the NHS Choices website.